INTERVIEW: SINNOBER

Interview

 

Acclaimed folk-rock duo Sinnober, Sebastian Brice (Vocals, Guitar) and Natalie Brice (Vocals, Keyboard, Bass), have just released their third album Projection, available now.

 

 

Q: This album seems more richly orchestrated in places, how did that come about?

 

NATALIE: For the last two albums, we were working as a trio with guitar, bass, and drums, which very much informed the arrangements. With Projection we moved away from that setup and had an urge to explore and expand our sound.

SEBASTIAN: Fortunately, one of the many perks of living in Frome is the abundance of creative talent, so local musician friends contributed to the recordings.

NATALIE: We are also pretty obsessed with the albums Hejira and The Hissing of Summer Lawns by Joni Mitchell, and they have undoubtedly informed the sound of Projection.

SEBASTIAN: Her music feels almost genreless and that’s where we feel most comfortable.

 

 

Q: “True North” is an absolutely beautiful song: what inspired you to write a song for your child?

 

SEBASTIAN: Thank you! Our son, Asher, is two years old now, but when we started writing the songs for Projection he was only a few months old, and we were in the throes of new parenthood.

NATALIE: Intense sleep deprivation, coupled with an overwhelming sense of love. Everything felt suddenly very poignant and this song came out of that.

SEBASTIAN: There’s also this rather limiting belief that if you want to be a serious artist, you can’t have children. Ironically, since having a child, our creativity has increased tenfold and because those pockets of space are so rare, when we do get them, we make sure we use them well.

 

 

Q: Tell me about the covers.

 

NATALIE: “No Regrets” is a Tom Rush song from 1968.  It’s one of Seb’s all time favourite songs, and we used to listen to it in the car, on this dodgy Old Grey Whistle Test mixtape, for years, before deciding to cover it. I guess our version is slightly different to the original, in that it’s sung by a female, so that changes the energy.

SEBASTIAN: “When a Knight Won His Spurs” is a song that Natalie used to sing to Asher to get him to sleep. A nostalgic and beautiful song that communicates, in a very imaginative way, the spiritual qualities that need to be nurtured in a child.

NATALIE: “Alexandra Leaving” is the last song on the album. We are massive Leonard Cohen fans. We got trolled by a guy on YouTube, because we’re singing the words as they are in Leonard Cohen’s Book Of Longing and not like his recording of the song.

 

 

Q: What’s next for Sinnober?

 

NATALIE: Our album launch for Projection, at Rook Lane Chapel in Frome, on October 18th!

SEBASTIAN: We’ll perform the album live, with guest musicians, followed by the opportunity for some massage, some couples therapy, and then maybe some more songs.

 

 

Book online now for the Projection album launch.

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KINGDOM | London, Camden People’s Theatre

Recommended

Created by Celine Lowenthal (Show Boat West End; Shadwell Opera) and Temi Wilkey (Hamlet RSC; Pecs: The Drag King Collective), Kingdom is a surrealist love song about two queer best friends who share a bedroom.

Step inside the kingdom of a couple of high femme weirdos with a magical world of their own. Taking place somewhere between the dream world of their minds and the real-life space of their very own bedroom, this show is a joyous celebration of queer friendship and feminine intimacy.

Creator Temi Wilkey explains in no uncertain terms: “We want to make theatre drenched in queerness and femininity, exploring and celebrating the magic of genuine intimacy; theatre that can offer something beautiful to the world, as an antidote to the cynicism and cruelty that often seems to pervade it.”

Kingdom is part of AndWhat? Queer Arts Festival; an October long celebration of the newest Queer-led cultural and artistic experiences, all across London.

Kingdom will play for three performances only, so book now.

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BRYONY KIMMINGS: I’M A PHOENIX, BITCH | London, Battersea Arts Centre

Recommended

Bryony Kimmings is renowned for her outlandish “social experiments”, with previous works seeing her retrace an STI to its source, spending seven days in a controlled environment in a constant state of intoxication, and becoming a pop star invented by a nine-year-old girl. Her most recent work, A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, was commissioned by Complicite and presented at the National Theatre.

In 2016 Kimmings nearly drowned: dealing with postnatal breakdowns, an imploding relationship and a very sick child. In 2018, Battersea Arts Centre invited her to create her first solo work in nearly a decade for the previously burnt down Grand Hall.  I’m a Phoenix, Bitch combines personal stories with epic film, soundscapes and ethereal music to create a powerful, dark and joyful work about motherhood, heartbreak and finding inner strength.

“My shows are usually born out of me going: ‘We don’t talk about this enough,'” Kimmings explains. “My hope with this show is to give a voice to the almost unspeakable traumas associated with postnatal depression and an ill child.  I want to create a show that cuts to the heart of these things, but does it in a way that people can relate to.”

Every performance of I’m a Phoenix, Bitch is relaxed, which means guests who can benefit from a more relaxed environment are welcome – there is a relaxed attitude to noise and movement and a designated ‘chill-out space’ is provided. The 19th October performance is captioned and BSL interpreted.

I’m a Phoenix, Bitch runs at the Battersea Arts Centre 3 – 20 October 2018.

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THE WIDER EARTH | London, Natural History Museum

Recommended

In an exciting collaboration, the National History Museum will be hosting The Wider Earth, an award-winning drama about 22-year old Charles Darwin’s voyage across the globe. Fronted by six young actors bubbling with enthusiasm, the show will bring originality, energy and fun to the story of Darwin’s five-year expedition on HMS Beagle.

The production will be fast-paced and colorful, combining an original score (Lior and Tony Buchen) with live drawings (Justin Harrison) projected on a concave backdrop. The centrepiece is a revolving set (David Morton, Aaron Barton) that offers a deconstructed version of rich wood-paneled HMS Beagle, offering unexpected vistas and angles.

The production, set in the beautiful Jerwood Gallery, will be framed with stone arches and a vaulted ceiling. Seating 357 people, this sparse and elegant space will provide a uniquely immersive experience for the audience. They’ll also pass by the Darwin Centre on their way to the show, to get them in the mood.

The play’s most charming attraction may well be its thirty puppets of iguanas, armadillos and other creatures, conceived by the Dead Puppets Society. These wooden cutouts move just like real animals; the actors operate them as feral extensions of their own bodies. Seeing it all come to life was magical, and enough to warrant this reviewer buying a ticket for opening night. Don’t miss it.

The Wider Earth runs from 2 October to 30 December 2018.

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THE WORM | Katzpace, London

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Hot on the heels of his New Zealand transfer of COFFIN, Elliott Langsdon brings a short ‘Work-In-Progress’ production of his new dark dramady to Katzpace in a strictly limited run of just five performances, all about “worming” one’s way back into a relationship. COFFIN received a phenomenal reception in London, and one New Zealand critic called it “the funniest play I’ve ever seen”.

“I’ve always been drawn to Machiavellian characters like Iago,” says Langsdon, “and this play is almost a little bit like a modern-day Othello in structure, but crammed with some absolutely mad humour and surreal moments. We’ve been having an absolute ball in rehearsals. I’m really excited for people to see it.”

Meet Stefan (Sam Goodchild) and Mica (Mica Williams): two young millennials just trying to get through their hectic lives whilst maintaining their relationship and paying off their student debt. Meet Sam (Sam Stay) and Faye (Melissa Coleman): Stefan and Mica’s best friends, and closest allies, as things seem to be going south. Meet Ben (Robert Frimston): Mica’s ex, down on his luck. Returned from the past. And ready to “patch things up”.

With adult themes, strong language and nudity, audiences can expect to do plenty of worming and squirming of their own. If COFFIN is anything to go by, Elliott Langsdon is one to watch, so get on down to Katzpace and get ready for THE WORM.

3 – 7 March 2018. Book online for £10 tickets.

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